Hi,  I have a query regarding the brown stain that is on one side of my hho plates, I read this is normal, I was wondering does this stain affect the production or quality of the hho gas? I operate my cell on my truck 10 hours a day and was wondering is there any way of cleaning this stain off the plates without taking it apart? I read that if the positive and negative poles are changed around that this cleans this stain off, is this correct?

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What electrolyte are you using?

I am using koh

Process of electrolysis. The color will vary depending on how hot/strong your electrolyte is and amperage. The positive and negative will be slightly different color. Don't reverse poles, since doing so cleans the plates, but also takes away the conditioned coating. I don't know if Bob Boyce is the guy to go to on plate conditioning, but he sure wrote a lot about it. Guys please correct anything that may be wrong in my post. Forgot sooo much. I'm stuck designing a zero current leakage cell.
The brown Stains are building up on the positive Side of the Plates. This Corrosion is caused through the Electrolysis Process. I belive that it reduces the Efficiency of your HHO Generator.
The higher the Current used, the faster the brown Stain builds up. Even if you use the best Stainless Steel Grade 316 L.
To change the Polarity seems a good Idea to me.
Also to fit a Fuel Filter into the Electrolyte Circulation Tubes would help to keep the System clean as possible.

Thanks for the replies

We have cleaned off plates in the past with muriatic acid and then flush with water before reuse. Reversing polarity is recommended to keep degradation of all plates the same. On our units, we reverse polarity every week or two and get a longer life span of the electrolyzer.

 

I hope this info is useful,

Glenn

 

 

thanks Glenn

Hi there,

I don't know if you came across this process.

1. Get your plates as clean as possible (or with your initial build after your plates are sanded and clean).

2. Already built generator you take a bucket of distilled water and add A LOT of citric acid (that you buy at the baking section of a grocery store)and throw in a small water pump and pump the stuff for a long time through your dry cell. I don't know how long, but did it for an hour or so.

3. Pump clean distilled water to get rid of all citric acid.

4. Then the most important thing - pump clean pure oxygen into the dry cell. This is important and will stain the plates to a pale grey colour. Pump it slowly so you do not waste the oxy, but at least have some minor flow to it. You can suck on the exit end to heal yourself with the oxygen - just kidding!!

This will let the plates last MUCH longer. Alternate polarity is also a good idea. If you can, try and lower the voltage slightly with making sure you still get enough HHO for your need.

My challenge is to split oxy and hydrogen - still no success with purely separated. I only get 20%/80% max. :-(

I know it helps. Hope it helps you.

Graham,

The reason the plates turn brown is because after the first time energizing your generator, it becomes a capacitor. Once you have applied power to the hho core, you can remover the connecting wires and still measure a charge in the plates. It will drain away in a second or two but the next time the system is energized it will again hold a charge once the power is turned off. This creates a flow of electrons which, over time leeches nickel from the stainless steel hardware (not the plates but the screws, washers and nuts with exposed surfaces to the electrolyte). In the electrolyte solution nickel takes on a negative charge and is attracted to the positive plate in the cell. There it bonds to the positive plate through electro-plating. Since the plates are only there to guide the path of the current, the plate itself never decomposes, it's a barrier that cracks the solution into hho as the current passes through the plate but the molecules riding on that current in the solution cannot.

I have a core over 5 years old where the positive plate is almost black but there has been no reduction in hho output. I clean the nickel powder from the core (still assembled) with tap water and rinse out the nickel sludge also with tap water then blow dry. Testing before and after outputs, I have not found any variations more tha 10 ml/min of hho. To my knowledge, the stain has no effect on the production out put of hho. I can see no reason why the systems can't last as long as the vehicle they're installed in as long as they're maintained properly.

My brother-in-law who teaches chemistry at a community college in Chesapeake, VA tells me that the sludge is a compound of sodium (potassium or calcium- whichever you use as an electrolyte) and nickel attached to 2 OH molecules. He tells me that this is a harmless water soluble compound. He says nickel is a transitional element that can take a charge of positive or negative depending on it's environment. The sludge is a harmless sodium nickel oxide.

We now use 18-8 stainless in all our hardware in contact with the solution but 316L seems to work fine for the plates. Since switching to 18-8 stainless hardware, the discoloration and deposits in the reservoir is no longer present however it has only been 5 months since we made the switch so the jury is still out.

Thanks for the info Barry.

Thanks Jaco
 
Jaco Bezuidenhout said:

Hi there,

I don't know if you came across this process.

1. Get your plates as clean as possible (or with your initial build after your plates are sanded and clean).

2. Already built generator you take a bucket of distilled water and add A LOT of citric acid (that you buy at the baking section of a grocery store)and throw in a small water pump and pump the stuff for a long time through your dry cell. I don't know how long, but did it for an hour or so.

3. Pump clean distilled water to get rid of all citric acid.

4. Then the most important thing - pump clean pure oxygen into the dry cell. This is important and will stain the plates to a pale grey colour. Pump it slowly so you do not waste the oxy, but at least have some minor flow to it. You can suck on the exit end to heal yourself with the oxygen - just kidding!!

This will let the plates last MUCH longer. Alternate polarity is also a good idea. If you can, try and lower the voltage slightly with making sure you still get enough HHO for your need.

My challenge is to split oxy and hydrogen - still no success with purely separated. I only get 20%/80% max. :-(

I know it helps. Hope it helps you.

The reason why the cathode plate turns brown is because it is being plated with debris from the anode. The brown layer that you see is from iron leaving the anode and being deposited (plated) unto the cathode. This is normal with stainless steel because it is mostly made up of iron.

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