The internal electrical Resistance is reduces by increasing the thickness of the Electrode Plates.  This would also increase the Voltage between the Plates and improve the HHO Production !

Views: 373

Attachments:

Replies to This Discussion

Your question suggests you don't fully understand how HHO is produced.

 

DC current flows from negative to positive. Two plates, one attached to a positive and the other to a negative terminal when placed close to each in an ionized water solution other will cause current to flow from the negative plate to the positive. As the water molecules touch the negative and postive plates either oxygen or hydrogen will be released. Hydrogen in the form of H2 will collect at the negative plate and oxygen in the form of O2 will collect at the negative plate.

 

Now, insert some plates inbetween the positive and negative plates and don't connect them to any source of current. These plates attract the current at the negative plate and give the current a path to follow to the positive plate. As the current leaves the negative plate, it travels through the ionized water carrying the ionized water molecules along with it till it reaches the first of the inner plates in the series. Now the current travels right through the first inner plate but the ionized water molecules cannot and at this point the ionized molecule cracks (the real scientific term)  apart on the surface of the plate releasing HHO plus some sodium or potassium normally used in the electrolyte solution.

Increasing the thickness of the inner plates will only increase resistance and thus require more amperage to yield the same amount of HHO as thinner plates.

 

I hope this clears things up for you.

 

Barry

Thank you Barry for the Explanation.

Have noticed that with the same amount of Current,  the Voltage  between each of the  the Plates is higher with thicker Plates, using the same Gap.

Why is that the Case ?

well  water is h20 that is hho

now add a electrolyte like koh

you dont split water   you split the electrolyte

so koh splits you have o and h liberated the k joins up with a hho

that liberates a h making koh to split again

the reason plates change voltage could be because of the amount of water between the plates some will be higher volt some will be lower remember all the gaps have to remain flooded

i hope this helps

Wow Barry,
Since when did asking a question give carte blanche for offering your opinion on someones level of understanding? Somewhat offputting to say the least... Your explanation by the way, is valid only for bipolar reactors, as it works just the opposite in unipolar reactors. Have a day.
(Specifically the resistance aspect)- I should have said.

Hans,

Without knowing the quantities of current and voltage it is difficult to say. There is more than one possible reason for what you are seeing.

 

I assume you are using the same hydrolyzer you sent pictures of. If that is the case, measure the current and voltage as accurately as you can and let me know what your figures are.

 

Hans Peter GROTE said:

Thank you Barry for the Explanation.

Have noticed that with the same amount of Current,  the Voltage  between each of the  the Plates is higher with thicker Plates, using the same Gap.

Why is that the Case ?

Don,

If the water is not split, why do you have to keep refilling the reservoirs?

don said:

well  water is h20 that is hho

now add a electrolyte like koh

you dont split water   you split the electrolyte

so koh splits you have o and h liberated the k joins up with a hho

that liberates a h making koh to split again

the reason plates change voltage could be because of the amount of water between the plates some will be higher volt some will be lower remember all the gaps have to remain flooded

i hope this helps

With my Circulation Pump the Problem with different Water levels in between the Electrode Plates does not exist. What i an talking about is, the thickness of the Plates seems to affect the Voltage between the Plates.

Barry

the bond of water is very strong... as memory serves me it's one of the strongest bond.

the electrolyte koh or naoh is a much weaker bond

so under electrolysis the oh of ether compound  is liberated. the k or na  is now looking to rejoin something here is water

k or na joins the hh0 = k or na hho this new bond liberates a "h" making koh or naoh

so you see hho really never splits it is transformed back to the electrolyte.

this is of course done unless you steam the k or na out of the solution.

but sense you split the electrolyte and rejoin back and it liberates the second "h" +"ho" from the splitting in the first reaction  the "h" and the "oh" as gas is water gas

here is a test if you think your splitting water..

put distilled water in your generator... what happens?.... unless something is different in your device nothing or very little



Barry Holzsweig said:

Don,

If the water is not split, why do you have to keep refilling the reservoirs?

don said:

well  water is h20 that is hho

now add a electrolyte like koh

you dont split water   you split the electrolyte

so koh splits you have o and h liberated the k joins up with a hho

that liberates a h making koh to split again

the reason plates change voltage could be because of the amount of water between the plates some will be higher volt some will be lower remember all the gaps have to remain flooded

i hope this helps

ok if the water level is full

then i would agree that the stainless thickness will affect the resistance. look at Ohm's law

you might help this condition by adding more electrolyte

a electrolyte changes the resistance or the dialectic constant.

A easy test is to change the electrolyte amount. if memory serves me you are allowed up to about 28%

as the concentration rises the amps will also rise and more hho will be liberated.

changing the % might help your gap voltages level out.

I will add one more thing. if the plates are warped or if the gasket got pressed uneven the gap voltage will change

look at it this way if your tring to pass voltage across 1/8 the resistance is x but if the gap has been compressed or warped to 7/64 the resistance is -x.

I'm guessing you are getting this problem in the middle of the generator.

i hope this helps



Hans Peter GROTE said:

With my Circulation Pump the Problem with different Water levels in between the Electrode Plates does not exist. What i an talking about is, the thickness of the Plates seems to affect the Voltage between the Plates.

RSS

*** Translate HODINFO ***

Latest Activity

Meryn Mckenzie is now a member of HODINFO
yesterday
Jim Mitchell commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronysis a Spectacular new Vernacular page 2'
Sep 14
gabet123 replied to gabet123's discussion 'Spammer Alert'
Sep 14
Jeremy Dukes commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronysis a Spectacular new Vernacular page 2'
Sep 13
Jeremy Dukes favorited Jim Mitchell's blog post Electronysis a Spectacular new Vernacular page 2
Sep 10
Jeremy Dukes favorited Jim Mitchell's blog post Electronysis a Spectacular new Vernacular page 2
Sep 10
Jim Mitchell commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronysis a Spectacular new Vernacular page 2'
Sep 10
Jeremy Dukes commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronysis a Spectacular new Vernacular page 2'
Sep 9
Jim Mitchell posted a blog post
Sep 9
Jeremy Dukes commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 7
Jaco Bezuidenhout commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 7
Jim Mitchell commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 6
Jim Mitchell commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 6
Jim Mitchell commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 6
Jaco Bezuidenhout commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 6
Jeremy Dukes commented on Jim Mitchell's blog post 'Electronyisis A Spectacular New Vernacular.'
Sep 5

© 2018   Created by gabet123.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

Live Chat