Well Hello to whom that is reading:

Let me describe my cell first. 4x4 inch square plates 31 plates. 4 electrical negative inputs & 3 positive outputs 24 neutral plates. Pretty common. Now here's the difference turn plates corners pointing up  and down. More like a diamond than most cells that I've seen on the net. The negative inputs come in at the bottom, corners the positive outputs are on top corners. So the current will flow as I wish the HHO to flow.

At 12 volts the cell will accept only 11.2 amps. Now with the cell powered by an industrial 14.7 volt 75 amp.output. alternator as power supply it will accept 32.1 amps and more. But the gas production  at this amperage exposes the top portion of the plates which is cutting production. I have two 3/8's inch gas outlets one front one rear. The 7 inch tall x 4 inch diameter half full  bubblier is just an inch or two above the cell. Why can't this amount of gas exit the cell if the bubblier outlet is exposed to the atmosphere. plus the cell is mounted on the same surface as the vibrating 11 HP engine.

Yes I have a PWM to control amperage. I will not run the cell much until I'm able to figure this out. I feel plate exposure is dangerous. 

Oh and the cell isn't warm yet! .   

Any thoughts thanks Gordon.    

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I think you need to rethink your design. First let me explain what you did wrong. You are combining 2 things in your design that prevent you from making an efficient cell. The current flows through water with electrolyte just the same as a wire. You are using wires to induce voltage between sets of plates in the common solution. That is wrong. If you want efficiency only use 1 input and 1 output. Your cell should only have a positive and negative connection, otherwise you are not getting maximum efficiency.

You need to limit the amount of cross amperage between plates. Your holes will actually allow amperage to jump through and waste power that could be making hydrogen. Your container should have the water paths in it that flows around the plates bottom and top. The natural flow of hho will create plenty of flow through an efficient design. The output from the cell should come in on the side of your bubbler below the water line, the return to bottom of cell is on the bottom of the bubbler.

Cell is best designed so that current is forced through the stack of plates. In order to do that you need a insulator around the plates with flow paths for fluid and gas flow. If you drill holes through a stack, offset each plate so the current does not bridge the hole directly through the plates. A better design has solid plates with gas and fluid paths in the insulator which forces current flow through the entire surface of the exposed plates.

When you design a cell try to get around 3/4-1 volt per plate. If you have done a great job isolating the plates and getting gas to flow you can operate a cell down to 1/2 volt per plate. At that level you will have a cold cell. At 3/4 volt you will have a lukewarm cell. At 1 volt per plate you will get enough heating to feel it, but not enough to be uncomfortable to touch. Any more than 1 volt per plate creates resistance and wastes energy. The waste is translated into heat. An inefficient cell creates heat. The more inefficient the hotter it gets until it boils.

A series cell is the worst possible design for HHO, but very good for a water heater. A parallel cell is very efficient as long as the flow paths are adequate for the production. The difference between a "WET" cell and a "DRY" cell is the separation of water between plates. If you think of a circuit it is easy to see that the water pockets between the plates are the same as a wire. If you apply voltage to the left side it will flow through the plates to the right side as long as there is enough resistance in the water to allow current flow.

If you want to control how much current you use you will need a PWM. You can mix a strong electrolyte with a pwm and hold your production exactly where you want it. A good design will produce 1 liter under 10 amps. Most cars will use 1/4 to 1/2 lpm to improve mpg. If you have O2 sensors competing with the HHO you may need to add a good effie and get the O2 sensors adjusted for the added O2 from the cell. The ecm will compensate for O2 so resetting the base voltage at the O2 will cause a new baseline for the ecm and it will take the HHO. If you can separate the O2 then there is no need for the effie.

The most important thing with cell design is testing. Always be sure you keep logs of your designs so you can see what improvements worked and why. Good luck.



Robert Bley said:

I think you need to rethink your design. First let me explain what you did wrong. You are combining 2 things in your design that prevent you from making an efficient cell. The current flows through water with electrolyte just the same as a wire. You are using wires to induce voltage between sets of plates in the common solution. That is wrong. If you want efficiency only use 1 input and 1 output. Your cell should only have a positive and negative connection, otherwise you are not getting maximum efficiency.

You need to limit the amount of cross amperage between plates. Your holes will actually allow amperage to jump through and waste power that could be making hydrogen. Your container should have the water paths in it that flows around the plates bottom and top. The natural flow of hho will create plenty of flow through an efficient design. The output from the cell should come in on the side of your bubbler below the water line, the return to bottom of cell is on the bottom of the bubbler.

Cell is best designed so that current is forced through the stack of plates. In order to do that you need a insulator around the plates with flow paths for fluid and gas flow. If you drill holes through a stack, offset each plate so the current does not bridge the hole directly through the plates. A better design has solid plates with gas and fluid paths in the insulator which forces current flow through the entire surface of the exposed plates.

When you design a cell try to get around 3/4-1 volt per plate. If you have done a great job isolating the plates and getting gas to flow you can operate a cell down to 1/2 volt per plate. At that level you will have a cold cell. At 3/4 volt you will have a lukewarm cell. At 1 volt per plate you will get enough heating to feel it, but not enough to be uncomfortable to touch. Any more than 1 volt per plate creates resistance and wastes energy. The waste is translated into heat. An inefficient cell creates heat. The more inefficient the hotter it gets until it boils.

A series cell is the worst possible design for HHO, but very good for a water heater. A parallel cell is very efficient as long as the flow paths are adequate for the production. The difference between a "WET" cell and a "DRY" cell is the separation of water between plates. If you think of a circuit it is easy to see that the water pockets between the plates are the same as a wire. If you apply voltage to the left side it will flow through the plates to the right side as long as there is enough resistance in the water to allow current flow.

If you want to control how much current you use you will need a PWM. You can mix a strong electrolyte with a pwm and hold your production exactly where you want it. A good design will produce 1 liter under 10 amps. Most cars will use 1/4 to 1/2 lpm to improve mpg. If you have O2 sensors competing with the HHO you may need to add a good effie and get the O2 sensors adjusted for the added O2 from the cell. The ecm will compensate for O2 so resetting the base voltage at the O2 will cause a new baseline for the ecm and it will take the HHO. If you can separate the O2 then there is no need for the effie.

The most important thing with cell design is testing. Always be sure you keep logs of your designs so you can see what improvements worked and why. Good luck.

I haven't posted much lately, but here it goes. Sorry I don'y have photos of what I've changed. But the cell has twin 1/2 inch outlets into the side of the bubblier. For those of you that have foam issues try putting stainless steel wool in your output lines. The foaming will be minimal in your bubblier. I've added a front input line. All lines are now 1/2 inch. The plates aren't exposed as much but still there is a quite a bit of a gas back up in the cell. The gases seem to want to stay within the cell and not exit. Cell temperature always drops when the cell is not moving the gases out.

On another point this may be a bit premature, but if your going to add the HHO the the engine. A introduce it just after the throttle blades. B. At the cold starting primer port. C. Before the carb in under the air cleaner. I was thinking a lower than atmospheric pressure within the the bubblier help the gases to flow better           

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